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 Message Boards » » Tea party officially labeled as a racist group? Page [1] 2 3 4 5 ... 10, Next  
mambagrl
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It could happen Tomorrow.

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2010/07/12/naacp-considers-condemning-tea-party-racism/
Quote :
"The NAACP reportedly is about to take up a resolution to condemn the Tea Party movement for "explicitly racist behavior."

The Kansas City Star reported that the organization plans to vote as early as Tuesday on the language at its annual convention in Kansas City. The resolution reportedly will call on "all people of good will to repudiate the racism of the Tea Parties" and stand against the movement's attempt to "push our country back to the pre-civil rights era."

Tea Party groups have repeatedly denied allegations of racism. Gina Loudon, one of the founders of the St. Louis Tea Party, called the NAACP's charges untrue and said it was a "shame" the NAACP was going down that road.

"I can't believe that the Tea Party is even going to be put in a position of dignifying something like that," she said. "This is sad because this established organization is being used by the left."

She said Tea Partiers generally do all they can to give minority conservatives a platform.


According to the Kansas City Star, the NAACP resolution will accuse the groups of engaging in racist behavior by displaying signs "intended to degrade people of color generally and President Barack Obama specifically."

It will also accuse the activists of abusing black members of Congress -- an apparent reference to an incident in March when Tea Party protesters allegedly hurled racial epithets at black lawmakers on Capitol Hill ahead of a health care vote. Tea Party members afterward challenged that account and no evidence was produced to show any racist actions."

7/12/2010 9:37:28 PM

marko
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i've decided to label myself Archduke of My Bathroom

7/12/2010 9:43:35 PM

moron
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This will be the surest way to boost their numbers, unfortunately.

7/12/2010 10:03:52 PM

d357r0y3r
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I can't speak for everyone, but when I talked about the "constitution" and "limited government," I mean to say "I hate black people."

7/12/2010 10:06:05 PM

lewisje
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well to be fair that's what bull connor meant back in the day when he spoke of "law and order"

the NAACP's pretty good at pickin up on them dog whistles

7/12/2010 10:10:07 PM

indy
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Quote :
"engaging in racist behavior by displaying signs "intended to degrade people of color generally and President Barack Obama specifically."

If you criticize a black president, you must be racist.



-----------------------------------------------------
Soap Box poll:

I: The Tea Party is a racist group
II: The NAACP is a racist group

a) I is true
b) II is true
c) I & II are both true
d) neither I or II is true



I'll start:

b

7/13/2010 1:40:59 AM

hooksaw
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Is the NAACP going to label the New Black Panther Party racists, too? Just checking.

7/13/2010 4:21:02 AM

tromboner950
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The NAACP labeling someone as racist makes it "official"?
What?

I mean, I know this is a mambagrl thread, but... goddamn, that's fucking stupid.

7/13/2010 6:51:58 AM

ThePeter
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Not hard to believe when you have "First Racist" Michelle visiting the NCAAP as a keynote speaker just before the vote.

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/naacp-tea-party-civil-rights-group-considers-resolution/story?id=11144640
Michelle Obama Rouses NAACP Before Vote Condemning 'Racist' Elements of Tea Party

7/13/2010 7:48:07 AM

DaBird
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Quote :
"i've decided to label myself Archduke of My Bathroom"


LOL

7/13/2010 9:32:04 AM

BridgetSPK
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^^AHA, WTF, ABC?

She talked about fat kids, not the Tea Party!

7/13/2010 11:24:09 AM

xvang
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http://white-people-black-people.funnypart.com/

7/13/2010 11:54:29 AM

indy
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This crap, and stuff like the neighborhood school protests, really mark the beginning of the end for racist groups like the NAACP.
Good riddance.

7/13/2010 11:57:09 AM

BridgetSPK
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^Whoa, whoa, whoa, you can't lump people on the ground protesting the recent changes in our schools in with a bunch of fat politician-types passing a meaningless resolution about whether or not some people are racist.

7/13/2010 12:03:28 PM

indy
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Quote :
"people on the ground protesting"

I'm not talking about the people, I'm talking about the NAACP's efforts to organize the protests.

7/13/2010 12:35:01 PM

Supplanter
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How the Tea Party May Hurt GOP Senate Prospects

http://www.time.com/time/politics/article/0,8599,2003079,00.html?cnn=yes

Quote :
"There are two significant differences between Obama's grass-roots upswell and the rise of the Tea Party adherents. First, Obama attracted people across a wide swath of the political spectrum, from the far left to just right of center; the Tea Party is almost exclusively hard right. Second, the Obamans were insurgent in their mind-set but downright establishment in their technology, organization, fundraising and ability to use the existing rules to beat the power players at their own game. For all its energy, the Tea Party has not had the chance to demonstrate the same sustained capacity for winning methodology and follow-through. (See portraits of the Tea Party movement.)

That means that while the Tea Partyers are enthusiastic and have earned a series of short-term victories, they aren't necessarily destined for electoral success this fall. Their penchant for supporting less mainstream, less electable, more erratic candidates, according to some worried senior Republican strategists, might jeopardize Republican chances in at least five Senate races in November and even the GOP presidential nominee in the general election two years hence.

The Colorado, Nevada and Pennsylvania Senate seats are all now held by Democrats; Florida and Kentucky have Republican incumbents. In Nevada, Tea Party favorite Sharron Angle beat establishment-backed candidates to become the nominee against the GOP's No. 1 target, Senate Democratic leader Harry Reid. But Angle has made comments denigrating Social Security, Medicare and the Department of Education. Kentucky Republicans chose Rand Paul to run in the general election, also over a more mainstream candidate. Paul made national news with his controversial remarks about the civil rights laws of the 1960s. In Florida, grass-roots conservative support for another Tea Party darling, Marco Rubio, turned Governor Charlie Crist from a lock to win the seat as a Republican into a thriving independent candidate. A similar thing happened in Pennsylvania, where longtime moderate Republican incumbent Arlen Specter was chased out of the party by conservative anger over his heretical behavior. In desperation, he switched his registration to try to hold the seat as a Democrat. In Colorado, a strong run by Republican Ken Buck, another volatile conservative, for the Aug. 10 primary will result in the nomination of Buck or a weakened establishment choice who has been discombobulated and driven to the right by party activists. (See pictures of Sarah Palin at the Tea Party convention in Nevada.)

With their unpredictable styles and imprudent mouths, the Tea Party–favored candidates, so dominant in the primaries, have put their general contests in peril at an especially critical time — when Republicans need to net 10 seats in order to win back control of the chamber. The Tea Party may display an admirable drive, but it is an indisputable reality that the same purity of views that has allowed the movement to dominate many primaries leaves the GOP vulnerable in November.

The Democrats in the Kentucky, Nevada and Colorado races now have the opportunity to so demonize the Republican nominees, based on their extreme issue positions and unartful statements, that they are rendered unelectable. This plays right into the White House dream scenario of turning the election from a referendum on Obama and his party's congressional leaders into a choice election for centrist voters. It also fires up Democratic loyalists and closes the so-called enthusiasm gap, as Democratic strategists and candidates wave the bloody shirt of the past votes and quotes of these surprise conservative candidates.

Given the political makeup of the states in which they are running and the national climate, the Republican nominees in all three contests should be heavily favored. Instead, national Republicans have had to devote precious resources to shore them up. Utah Republican Senator Bob Bennett, who lost his party's nomination under pressure from conservatives at a spring convention, is liberated to say in public what some Republicans are worried about privately. Bennett told the Associated Press last week that the Tea Party had "no strategy" and was making "mischief" that could cost Republicans all three seats.

And while the GOP may bid good riddance in the departures of Specter and Crist from the party — they too often flouted party orthodoxy — both men were likely more able to keep the seats in Republican hands than their replacements are. Democratic Congressman Joe Sestak, who bested Specter in the Pennsylvania primary, has a good chance to score a win in November. In Florida, Crist's high profile in the aftermath of the BP oil spill and a contested August Democratic primary has kept him ahead in the polls. And if Crist wins, he is expected to caucus with the Democrats."

7/13/2010 12:38:08 PM

merbig
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Quote :
"If you criticize a black president, you must be racist. "


Don't even play that fucking card. You know damn well that there are people within the Tea Party who are racist and who refer to Obama as a "nigger." No. Not everyone in the party does. But when you have people within the party voicing their racism to everyone, it will surely reflect back onto the organization. And don't sit here and deny that people within the organization haven't done anything racist. You know damn well that they have.

It's no different than condemning a protest because a few jackasses start a riot or hurl shit at the police officers. We see it all the time on Fox News and other conservative, when they portray a protest as violent because a few assholes act retarded, they condemn the entire event and everyone associated with it.

I don't agree with NAACP's assessment accurate, but I find it no more stupid than anything else I have heard in politics, from both the left and right side. It's just more dumb shit to add to the already growing ball of dumb shit.

7/13/2010 12:50:59 PM

McDanger
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Quote :
"Soap Box poll:

I: The Tea Party is a racist group
II: The NAACP is a racist group

a) I is true
b) II is true
c) I & II are both true
d) neither I or II is true


I'll start:

b

"


Ahahahahahahaha holy fucking shit, A+. Best laugh of the month, thanks.

7/13/2010 12:57:43 PM

Lumex
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The NAACP is a racist group.

The Tea Party is not a racist group; they just happen have a lot of racists.

7/13/2010 1:14:01 PM

Socks``
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Quote :
"Not everyone in the party does. But when you have people within the party voicing their racism to everyone, it will surely reflect back onto the organization."




Therefore, the Democratic Party is racist?

7/13/2010 1:16:29 PM

Lumex
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BARBARIC

7/13/2010 1:18:19 PM

indy
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Quote :
"The NAACP is a racist group.

The Tea Party is not a racist group; they just happen have a lot of racists."

7/13/2010 1:22:12 PM

lewisje
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^^^that guy repented by the time he entered politics

also I've had a hard time finding out what groups the NAACP considers racist, but I do know a similar group, the SPLC (Southern Poverty Law Center), keeps tabs on a lot of hate groups, and it considers both the New Black Panther Party and the JDL (Jewish Defense League) to be hate groups, respectively under "Black Separatist" and "General Hate": http://www.splcenter.org/get-informed/hate-map

7/13/2010 1:26:27 PM

indy
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National Association for the Advancement of Colored People
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People



QED

7/13/2010 1:32:21 PM

Supplanter
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http://www.dailykos.com/story/2010/7/12/883698/-Black-Powers-Gonna-Get-You-Sucka:-Right-Wing-Paranoia-and-the-Rhetoric-of-Modern-Racism

While the goal of this post was clearly aiming at showing Tea Party/conservative hypocrisy, it also includes a decent cataloging of data from research on the topic of racism. The whole thing would be way too much to repost here, but here is some of it. Of course you wont see the built in links here.

Quote :
"Was it the research indicating that job applicants with white sounding names have a 50 percent better chance of being called back for an interview than their counterparts with black-sounding names, even when all qualifications are the same?

No.

Was it the study that found white job applicants with criminal records have a better chance of being called back for an interview than black applicants without one, even when all the qualifications are the same?

No.

Was it the massive nationwide study that estimated at least 1 million cases of blatant job discrimination against blacks, Latinos and Asian Americans each year, affecting roughly one-in-three job seekers of color?

No.

Is it the fact that black males with college degrees are almost twice as likely as their white male counterparts to be out of work?

No.

Is it the data indicating that Chinese-American professionals earn less than 60 percent as much as their white counterparts, even though the Chinese Americans, on average, have more education?

No.

Was it the study that found the lightest-skinned immigrants to the United States make as much as 15 percent more than the darkest, even when the immigrants in question have the same level of education, experience and measured productivity?

No.

Perhaps they finally stumbled upon the evidence suggesting millions of cases of race-based housing discrimination against people of color each year, and this is what has them so incensed?

No.

Or maybe their anger is due to the reports of blatant racism practiced by Wells Fargo, which was deliberately roping black borrowers (to whom they referred as "mud people") into high-cost loans, targeting them for these instruments, and even falsifying credit histories to make black applicants look like greater risks than they were, so as to justify the scam?

No.

Was it the study demonstrating that e-mail inquiries about rental property submitted by people with white sounding names were 60 percent more likely than those with black sounding names to get a positive response from a landlord (meaning an indication that a unit was available for rent), even when the housing had been previously advertised as available?

No.

Maybe they’re furious because of the way whites in the New Orleans area conspired after the flooding of the city to keep blacks from returning and being able to find housing on equitable terms, if at all?

No.

Or maybe it’s because of the data from the Justice Department, to the effect that blacks are far more likely than whites to have their cars and persons searched after a traffic stop, even though whites, when searched, are more than four times as likely to have drugs or other illegal contraband on us?

No.

Well then, perhaps it’s the recent revelations that police in New York City are blatantly profiling blacks and Latinos, stopping and frisking them in massive numbers, even though in 90 percent of all cases, the people they stop are released without any charge because they are found to have done nothing illegal?

No.

Is the source of their anger the data showing that although whites and blacks use and sell drugs at roughly the same rates, African Americans are anywhere from 2.8 to 5.5 times more likely than whites to be arrested for a drug offense, depending on the year? Or perhaps the state level data indicating that in nine states, blacks are arrested at more than seven times the rate of whites, and in Minnesota and Iowa at rates that are more than eleven times greater than white arrest rates for drugs? Or perhaps the additional data that blacks are more than 10 times as likely as whites to be sent to prison for drug offenses, despite relatively equivalent rates of drug crimes? Or the fact that a majority of persons admitted to prison for drug offenses are black, even though there are about six times more white users nationwide?

No.

Maybe they're beside themselves over the fact that millions of black men who are ex-felons and have paid their debt to society are permanently blocked from voting thanks to disenfranchisement laws that were devised for blatantly racist reasons? Surely they are upset that these laws have led to blacks being denied the right to vote after serving their time at a rate that is 7 times the national average?"

7/13/2010 1:33:47 PM

brianj320
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Quote :
"You know damn well that there are people within the Tea Party who are racist and who refer to Obama as a "nigger." "


factually spoken, eh?

7/13/2010 2:00:18 PM

Supplanter
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^my first excerpt I tried to keep focused on references to research, but the person who compiled these links did have some stuff to say on Tea Party people. Here it is if you want to see what you can make of it, I haven't clicked through on any of the links yet to look at the sources from this section:

Quote :
"Well then it must be the blatant stuff. Maybe they finally got around to looking at those images of Tea Party protesters and other assorted conservatives coming to rallies with signs advocating the lynching of Democratic party leaders, or portraying the President as an African witch doctor? Or maybe somebody informed them of all the times that conservative and Republican Party activists have sent around blatantly racist e-mails lately, like those portraying the white house lawn covered in watermelons, or once again with the witch doctor imagery, or likening Michelle Obama to an ape, or picturing the President as a pair of "spook eyes" against a black background?

No.

Maybe they're angry at Tea Party leader Mark Williams for calling the President an "Indonesian Muslim" and a "welfare thug?" I mean, that's pretty racialized rhetoric, right?

No.

Or maybe it was the Tea Party leader in Ohio who tweeted about how he wants to shoot Hispanic immigrants, to whom he refers as "spicks?" (sic)

No.

Well then surely it must have been the story about Tea Party candidate for Governor in New York who sent e-mails picturing the President dressed as a pimp and featuring a group of African tribesman performing a traditional dance, which he referred to as the "Obama Inauguration Rehearsal?"

No.

Perhaps what has them angry is the statement by that Arizona Congressman, to the effect that black folks were better off under slavery than they are today?

No.

Maybe it was because of those guys over at the popular right-wing website, FreeRepublic.com who called the President's daughter, Malia, "typical ghetto trash," and a "whore" whose mother likes to entertain her by "making monkey sounds?"

No.

Or perhaps they finally had enough when they heard about how Rep. Ciro Rodriguez was called a "wetback" by one of his constituents and told to go back to Mexico?

No.

Or maybe it was that lawmaker in South Carolina who called both President Obama and Republican Gubernatorial candidate (and Indian American) Nikki Haley, "ragheads?"

No.

Or perhaps they're upset about how the guy who sponsored the law in Arizona, ostensibly to catch "illegal immigrants" (a law they support), turns out to be pals with neo-Nazis? Or the fact that the organization that takes credit for writing the bill has longstanding ties to blatant racists and hate groups?"


The whole article ends by saying all this documented racism isn't the racism that bothers the tea party/republicans/conservatives, its the "reverse racism" that they're mad about.

7/13/2010 2:11:50 PM

lewisje
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Quote :
"No.

It is none of this. Neither the evidence of systemic discrimination against people of color in every walk of American life, nor the repeated examples of blatant racism directed towards people of color individually moves them.

But they're angry nonetheless about racism in America.

They're especially angry about the tax being placed on those who use tanning salons. Because this is racist. Against white people. No, seriously.

Oh, and the President criticized a white police officer for arresting a black man for a crime that, turns out, the black man didn't actually commit, according to state law. That Obama would do such a thing--namely, criticize an officer for making an unjustified arrest--means that white police officers are "under assault" from Obama, and that the President is trying to "destroy" the white officer, no doubt because he's white.

Oh, and since people of color disproportionately lack health care coverage, the President's plan for expanding coverage is obviously a racist scheme to get reparations for slavery.

Oh, and the President is deliberately trying to destroy the economy so as to pay back white people for slavery and hundreds of years of oppression.

Oh, and two black kids beat up a white kid on a bus in Belleville, Illinois--something that is obviously due to Obama being President.

Oh, and the President picked Eric Holder as Attorney General. Since Holder has said Americans have often been "cowards" when it comes to discussing race, this proves that Holder is racist against white people, even though he didn't mention white people. He said Americans, and Americans means white people. So he's a bigot. And so is Obama for picking him.

Oh, and the President nominated Sonia Sotomayor to the Supreme Court. And she's a Latina, who notes that she sees the world through the lens of her experience, and that she hopes that experience would positively inform her decision-making. And that means she's a bigot. And the fact that Obama nominated her, as well as Eric Holder, proves that he "views white men as the problem" in America, and that the only way you can get promoted by Obama is "by hating white people." Like Tim Geithner, who most definitely hates your honky ass.

Oh, and the President also nominated Elena Kagan, and Kagan once worked for Justice Thurgood Marshall, and Marshall once said the Constitution as originally conceived--which, ya know, excluded blacks from citizenship--was flawed. Imagine. And this means that Marshall was anti-white, and anyone who worked for him must be too.

Oh, and the Obama Justice Department dropped criminal voter intimidation charges against three members of the New Black Panther Party in Philadelphia (while obtaining an injunction against a fourth member). So this proves the Administration is allied with the Panthers, whose Philly leader proclaims that he "hates all white people," and Obama probably agrees with him, and is refusing to prosecute because he doesn't care about white folks' voting rights. In fact, the New Black Panthers are part of Obama's "army of thugs." Even though the same Philly leader of the group didn't support Obama for President, and has called Obama a "puppet" and "slavemaster." And of course, as a point of fact, the criminal charges against the other three Panthers were dropped by the Bush Department of Justice. And there have been no voters who actually claim to have been intimidated by the Panthers. And even a leading conservative Republican on the Civil Rights Commission says the incident is much ado about nothing.

Oh, and since the Justice Department is considering bringing federal charges against the white officer who killed Oscar Grant--a black man--in cold blood in Oakland last year, this proves that we've returned to the 1950s, only this time it's whites who are the victims of racist oppression. Because it's oppression to bring charges against a white cop who kills someone. Naturally.

Yes indeed, they all agree, Obama is a "reverse racist" who has a deep-seated hatred of white people, and who is like Hitler, and we know this because he's proposing a national service corps to help work on various community problems, and this is just like the Nazi SS, well, except for the murdering part. Or if not Hitler, then at the very least he's just like an "African colonial despot".

And for sure, Obama is the reason race relations are so strained: not because of the ongoing discrimination against people of color, which the data indicates is commonplace, or because of the incendiary rhetoric coming from conservative commentators. But because of Barack Obama.

Race relations could never be strained by say, for instance, having a white talk show host fantasize about murdering a black congressman with a shovel.

Or by another host calling undocumented migrants from Mexico "invasive species".

Or by spreading lies about how 5 million so-called "illegal aliens" were given subprime mortgages, as a way to blame the undocumented for the housing meltdown, even though there is no evidence whatsoever to support the fabricated claim.

Or by alleging that ACORN (a community-based organization comprised mostly of people of color) committed massive voter fraud so as to help elect Obama, even though there is no evidence that a single illegitimate vote was cast due to ACORN's voter registration efforts, and despite the fact that when a few ACORN operatives filed phony voter registration cards, it was ACORN itself that alerted election officials to the problem

Or by a prominent conservative commentator insisting that white men are experiencing the same kind of oppression that blacks faced for years, even as that commentator has previously reminisced fondly about the days of segregation.

Or by another radio host and prominent conservative author blaming "multicultural" people for "destroying" the country, or calling Arab Muslims "non-humans," or fantasizing about killing people in the "civil rights business."

Or by another radio host and prominent conservative author referring to the mostly black residents of New Orleans, in the wake of Katrina as "worthless parasites" and "human parasitic garbage" because of their high rates of welfare receipt. Even though, according to Census data, there were only 4600 households in all of the city receiving cash welfare at the time of the flooding, which was less than 4 percent of all black households in the city, and whose annual benefits came to only around $2800 per year.

Or by walking around with a sign suggesting that President Obama intends to put white people into slavery.

Or by saying that President Obama only won the election because he's black, and if he weren't black, he'd be a tour guide in Honolulu.

Or by saying that the only reason Colin Powell endorsed Obama was as an act of racial bonding.

Or by saying that Oprah Winfrey is also successful only because she's black.

Or by blaming the economic collapse on fair lending laws and lending to minorities, even though all the evidence suggests such laws and such loans had nothing to do with the housing or larger economic crises.

Or perhaps by having a right-wing talk show host announce a plan for conservatives to "take back the civil rights movement," and compare himself to Martin Luther King Jr. This, even though conservatives were almost uniformly opposed to the movement and King, and even though the talk show host's favorite authors, whose work he promotes regularly, viewed the movement as a communist conspiracy and referred to civil rights activists as animals.

Or by another conservative comparing himself to Dr. King, and speaking of how much he respects King's legacy, even as he--the conservative--has said he believes private businesses should have the right to discriminate on the basis of race.

No, none of those things could strain race relations, or further racism.

And certainly not when compared to a tanning booth tax.

While on the face of it, these kinds of right-wing inanities may seem so absurd as to hardly merit being taken seriously, it's important to step back and think about the internal logic of even the most outlandish claims. I mean, no one can honestly believe that health care reform is reparations. After all, what the hell kind of reparations is it where you have to get sick first in order to get paid? That's not a good hustle. And no one can really believe that some white kid got beat up on a bus because it's "Obama's America," as if the President had sent a text message to those black guys saying: HEY, YNOT BEAT SUM CRAKA ASS 4 ME, U DIG?

But the intellectual strength of the claims is not the issue. It doesn't matter. From a political perspective, even the most insane-sounding claim about Obama's supposed hatred for white people makes sense. It's a perfect way to prime white racial fears and anxieties, to say, in effect, they're coming for your money white folks, and then your children. In a nation where the population will be half people of color within 25-30 years, and where the popular culture is now thoroughly multicultural (and thus many of the icons don't look the way they used to), and where the President doesn't fit a lot of people's conception of what such a person is supposed to look like, and where the economy is in the toilet for millions, playing upon white anxiety is the perfect recipe for political mobilization.

They've said very clearly that they want their country back. And if we who oppose the right don't challenge these folks for the racists they are, or continue to shy away from making race an issue (as if it weren't already), they just might get it.

Tim Wise is the author of five books and over 250 essays on race. His latest is Colorblind: The Rise of Post-Racial Politics and the Retreat from Racial Equity (San Francisco: City Lights Books, 2010)."

7/13/2010 2:13:32 PM

d357r0y3r
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Quote :
"The NAACP is a racist group.

The Tea Party is not a racist group; they just happen have a lot of racists."

7/13/2010 2:31:02 PM

merbig
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Quote :
"factually spoken, eh?"


Yup. There is no racists who associate with the tea party at all...



Get real and open your eyes.

7/13/2010 2:56:01 PM

marko
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monkey can't be the best you've got

7/13/2010 3:02:55 PM

lewisje
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Quote :
"monkey can't be the best you've got"
It took about 15 seconds to find these images



also there's this image, which is a bit too big to post here: http://chattahbox.com/images/2010/01/teaparty_robertson_spelling_racist_problem.jpg

7/13/2010 3:53:59 PM

Mr. Joshua
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Devil's advocate:
How is that any worse than "A village in Texas is missing it's idiot"?

7/13/2010 4:11:22 PM

lewisje
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that one isn't racist

and it's also more based in the truth, because listening to that fucker speak in public, you could be forgiven for thinking he's an idiot

7/13/2010 4:13:49 PM

marko
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now we're cookin'

7/13/2010 4:27:08 PM

Socks``
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^


[Edited on July 13, 2010 at 4:37 PM. Reason : ``]

7/13/2010 4:36:47 PM

moron
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Quote :
"How is that any worse than "A village in Texas is missing it's idiot"?
"


Because the Obama sign is trying to de-legitimize his presidency by implying that Obama is not American, if you remember the context of a lot of those signs. And it also is using an innate quality that he can't control (ethnic background) to make fun of him.

The Bush thing is just calling him an idiot by using the old joke "your village called, their idiot is missing."

In any case, Obama is smart enough not to get bent out of shape by the racist remarks, because it comes with the territory. Politics is a dirty business. It doesn't become a problem until the GOP as an organization embraces these sentiments, which so far, en masse, they have not (at least not openly).

7/13/2010 4:42:11 PM

lewisje
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oh good point, I oughta dig up some blatantly Birtherist sentiment displayed by the Teabaggers

7/13/2010 4:49:46 PM

Supplanter
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Found a smaller one of the lewisje linked to but was too big to post, I knew I had seen it somewhere on tdub before.

Quote :
"The Top Tea-bagger is apparently both a racist and a bad speller:

http://www.pensitoreview.com/2010/01/04/photo-shows-top-tea-bagger-holding-sign-with-n-word-which-he-misspelled/

"

-KE4ZNR

Quoting from that article:

Quote :
"It’s going to be a lot harder for Tea Baggers to claim they’re not racists now that a photo has emerged of Dale Robertson, who calls himself the “president and founder of the Tea Party,” holding a sign that reads,”Congress = Slave Owner; Taxpayer = Niggar.”

The photo was taken in Houston on Feb. 27, 2009

Robertson is the operator of the Tea Party website (teaparty.org)."


And a few more fun pics while we're at it:







The McCarthyism streak in the Tea Party is the part I've always found the most amusing.

[Edited on July 13, 2010 at 4:56 PM. Reason : .]

7/13/2010 4:53:49 PM

Supplanter
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7/13/2010 5:46:14 PM

lewisje
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POLTICAL POLITIANS and DIPERS

7/13/2010 6:06:49 PM

Supplanter
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Wow. Just saw this new headline:

Iowa Tea Party group's sign links Obama, Hitler



Quote :
" DES MOINES, Iowa — A billboard created by an Iowa tea party group comparing President Barack Obama to Adolf Hitler and Vladimir Lenin is being condemned by other tea party activists.

The North Iowa Tea Party began displaying the sign in Mason City last week.

The sign includes photos of Obama, Nazi leader Hitler and communist leader Lenin with the statement: "Radical leaders prey on the fearful & naive."

North Iowa Tea Party co-founder Bob Johnson says the sign highlights what the group argues is Obama's support for socialism."


It's hard to have a serious discussion about the Tea Party when they throw up signs like this during the middle of the discussion.

7/13/2010 7:09:25 PM

hooksaw
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^ Where was your outrage when similar attacks--and worse--were made against Bush?





And so on ad nauseum.

7/13/2010 7:22:26 PM

moron
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^ people didn't really start comparing Bush to hitler until near the end of his first term.

And as far as billboards/signs are concerned, the anti-Obama ones are FAR worse than the Bush ones.

7/13/2010 7:30:07 PM

hooksaw
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^ And?

Bush and Hitler
Compare and Contrast
January 31, 2003


http://www.counterpunch.org/madsen01312003.html

Ad Comparing Bush to Hitler Gets Heat
January 06, 2004


http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,107426,00.html

31 Similarities Between Hitler and President Bush
August 29, 2004


http://dissidentvoice.org/Articles3/Jayne_Hitler-Bush.htm

And what could possibly be worse than images suggesting or outright calling for Bush to hanged or shot in the head or some other vile act?





And those doing this type of thing with images and effigies of Obama are just as wrong. I condemn these acts in the strongest possible terms!

[Edited on July 13, 2010 at 7:46 PM. Reason : .]

7/13/2010 7:45:31 PM

m52ncsu
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neither of those things are racist, but why do you think that because someone did something before its ok? you are such a partisan hack.

7/13/2010 7:49:34 PM

hooksaw
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^ Try again.

Quote :
"And those doing this type of thing with images and effigies of Obama are just as wrong. I condemn these acts in the strongest possible terms!"


hooksaw

[Edited on July 13, 2010 at 7:52 PM. Reason : So, it's only bad if it's racist? Really?]

7/13/2010 7:51:38 PM

m52ncsu
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its only what we are discussing

7/13/2010 8:03:40 PM

moron
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Quote :
"^ And?
"


Quote :
"And as far as billboards/signs are concerned, the anti-Obama ones are FAR worse than the Bush ones.
"

7/13/2010 8:05:35 PM

lewisje
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and also less justified

I mean Bush actually made some damnable decisions before the hate came on

also, closer to the thread topic, this expresses how I hope the NAACP feels about the Black Panthers and similar groups:
Quote :
"Black separatists typically oppose integration and racial intermarriage, and they want separate institutions — or even a separate nation — for black people in America. Most contemporary forms of black separatism are strongly anti-white and anti-Semitic, and a number of religious versions assert that blacks — not Jews — are the Biblical "chosen people" of God.

Although the Southern Poverty Law Center recognizes that much black racism in America is, at least in part, a response to centuries of white racism, it believes racism must be exposed in all its forms. White groups espousing beliefs similar to black separatists would be considered clearly racist. The same criterion should be applied to all groups regardless of their color.

As Martin Luther King Jr. once said: "Violence begets violence; hate begets hate; and toughness begets a greater toughness. It is all a descending spiral, and the end is destruction — for everybody. Along the way of life, someone must have enough sense and morality to cut off the chain of hate."

A leading example of a black separatist group is the Nation of Islam led by Louis Farrakhan. In 1997, and in less explicit ways since then, Farrakhan made clear that he had renounced none of the anti-white, anti-Semitic, anti-Catholic and anti-gay views of the previous Nation leader, Elijah Mohammed. Those beliefs include the view that Yacub, a renegade black "scientist," created whites 6,600 years ago as an inherently evil and ungodly people — "blue-eyed devils." Farrakhan has described Catholics and Jews, who he said practice a "gutter religion," as preying on blacks. He regrets the "tone" of a former principal subordinate who called for slaughtering white South Africans, but agreed with the message. He called for racial separatism and inveighed against interracial relationships.

If a white group espoused similar beliefs with the colors reversed, few would have trouble describing it as racist and anti-Semitic. Although the racism of a group like the Nation may be relatively easy to understand, if we seek to expose white hate groups, we cannot be in the business of explaining away the black ones."

http://www.splcenter.org/get-informed/intelligence-files/ideology/black-separatist

7/13/2010 9:18:55 PM

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