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BigHitSunday
Dick Danger
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2

9/28/2010 2:53:27 PM

GeniuSxBoY
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2.02

9/28/2010 2:54:58 PM

qntmfred
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lol indy

9/28/2010 3:01:52 PM

billytalent
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Quote :
"the DARPA challenges have a more difficult requirement set, as it's designed to operate in typical military environments. and even then, the progress from year to year is amazing

creating a vehicle appropriate for urban environments is much simpler. still challenging, but certainly easier. technology isn't the hurdle so much as agreeing on sufficient safety regulations, as well as local city governments supporting these initiatives. i think we'll see first models on the roads in 10 years, and then commonly on the road within 10 years after that"


i'm talking about the DARPA urban challenge

the missions are exactly what you describe in your second paragraph

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DARPA_Grand_Challenge_(2007)

[Edited on September 28, 2010 at 3:14 PM. Reason : d]

[Edited on September 28, 2010 at 3:14 PM. Reason : d]

9/28/2010 3:12:46 PM

indy
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^^
As long as your idiot-box-on-wheels idea is, and always remains, 100% decentralized and opt-in, it might be okay.
Maybe.


But then, the attitude revealed by statements like, "you won't need to buy your own car anymore." is wildly dangerous.
I don't think you get it.



Why don't you focus more on things that actually help.... like a full-screen-width thread-iframe on the "Reply to Topic" page?

9/28/2010 3:14:19 PM

billytalent
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ideas aren't dangerous

simmer down

9/28/2010 3:15:59 PM

indy
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I can't even see the link to page 2 in the iframe without scrolling, because it's so fucking inadequate.

and this guy wants to SAVE THE WORLD with stupid robot cars.


9/28/2010 3:20:29 PM

Shadowrunner
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Quote :
"i'd be interested in hearing Shadowrunner's thoughts on this subject"


I definitely checked to see if this was a script. Pleasantly surprised that it wasn't, so I figured I should actually respond.


I think this will eventually happen, as the technological barriers are definitely surmountable, and there are too many incentives for it not to take root. As has been linked, there are several challenge races and "X Prize"-style competitions in place to encourage progress with the technology, and it's quite promising; I believe at least one of these did already involve interaction with "live" human traffic, but I may be wrong on that. The technology already exists to accomplish automated driving, but it will take a bit more time to be able to accomplish it to a higher standard of safety and in a greater range of environmental conditions. A number of advanced vehicle control systems are already in commercial cars--mostly in the guise of safety features, like the Volvo system that warns of impending collisions and brakes if you don't respond, and alerts you if the car thinks you're getting sleepy, but also in outright vehicle control, like the automatic parallel parking systems on Lexuses. These features will continue to expand.

And the benefits to full automation are potentially enormous, too big to ignore. Massive savings on fuel efficiency, increased productivity, decreased shipping costs, reduced injuries and fatalities, decreased wear on road infrastructure, lower insurance premiums, etc.

The major hurdles, as I see it, are from a policy and politics standpoint (these are different but related). Car manufacturers will eventually be on-board for this, as they will profit from the transition. It will appeal to a commercially viable segment of the transportation market, so I'm sure several companies will be willing to take the risk of being first-movers at some point. The policy problem is that there is currently no regulation that would clear up the liability question or provide industry standards which would minimize safety issues and consumer confusion and encourage consumer acceptance. There will be unavoidable collisions (just like there are now), but the spectre of liability shifting further away from individual drivers to vehicle manufacturers is likely to be a big deterrant until the technology fully matures and becomes industry-standard, regulations are put into place, and consumer awareness grows. The politics problem is that there would potentially be some big corporations and unions lobbying hard against it, like the petroleum industry, cab drivers and teamsters.

There's a guy I work with, Marty Wachs, who is an internationally-recognized expert on transportation infrastucture. I was going to say I would ask him about his thoughts on this next time I see him, but I checked and he's already written a recent report on some of the issues. It was reassuring to see that he is also focused on the liability and regulation problem and views that as the primary obstacle, as well. If you're interested in knowing more from an expert, check out the report, Liability and Regulation of Autonomous Vehicle Technologies. The Publications Database for CA PATH is definitely worth checking out, as they've done a lot of research on this topic as well, both on advanced vehicle control systems and also intelligent vehicle highway systems (the infrastructure side of the equation): http://www.path.berkeley.edu/Default.htm

If you check the references on the RAND report, there are lots of good studies, and you can see they've been going on for well over a decade.


indy, no one is proposing to take away your freedom by forcing you to use an autonomous vehicle. You would have more freedom, in that you would have another new transportation option to avail yourself of, if you should choose. Mandating such technology is not even on the table, and it's frankly a bit silly to think that the market would evolve into a centralized system where the government owns all your transport and forces you to use automated cars. Car companies would compete for market share just like they do now; most likely the government would continue to supply construction and repairs for any new infrastructure, just like they do now. Such construction would likely be minimal due to constraints imposed by our current transportation grid and manual vehicles.

These systems have to be put into place over time in baby steps, integrating fully with manual drivers the whole way. So by the time fully automating the transportation fleet even becomes a possibility, we'll be extremely good at adapting to human drivers in proximity of an automated vehicle. If human drivers ever become a minority, there would be marginal efficiency gains to going fully automated, but it shouldn't necessary; I imagine that people who enjoy driving will always be able to do so--if anything, cars should continue to have full manual overrides as a safety concern in case something goes wrong with the automated system, so it's not like the option will be removed. If we ever get to that point, you can start objecting and I'll be right there with you, but for now, my personal opinion is that that possibility is too far down the slippery slope and too improbable regardless to worry about right now.

"you won't need to buy your own car anymore" doesn't imply "you can't buy your own car anymore," and it doesn't imply centralization. It implies you won't need to anymore if you don't want to, because autonomous vehicle technologies would add another option to mass transit. It doesn't mean driverless cars are owned and run like light rail or metro bus systems; government could just as easily sell or lease space for private companies to set up stations like a network of cab stands more free-ranging than any subway is capable of. Think less like the subway and more like urban bicycle sharing systems; yes, many of those are publicly run, but that's because it's in the city's interest and they want to promote alternative transit. Some are public-private partnerships, but autonomous vehicles represent a much much larger potential profit than bike-shares, so private companies will be much more interested in this.

In short, liberty and danger vs. authority and safety is a false dichotomy. Safety can be achieved alongside liberty in this case.

9/28/2010 7:00:34 PM

Chop
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...or you could just take the bus

9/28/2010 7:09:39 PM

qntmfred
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thank you sir. as usual, your analysis is both accurate and insightful

thanks for the link to that research as well. this topic comes up fairly frequently in popular tech-oriented blog and news sites, i really want to seek out the circle of people who focus on this subject full-time

9/28/2010 7:12:31 PM

ShawnaC123
2019 Egg Champ
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Quote :
"wait...shawna?"


10/2/2010 12:22:43 AM

omgyouresexy
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Quote :
"where cars will drive themselves. cars will have dozens of sensors, and internal computer systems will use this information to safely navigate the car to its destination. rather than sit in traffic an hour a day, i'll just sit back and watch some tv, read a book/internet, or chat with my family. cars will be able to wirelessly communicate with other vehicles, and coordinate traffic flows in such a way that travel times will be significantly reduced. I believe in a future where the blue screen of death will literally result in such."

10/2/2010 8:33:46 AM

Tarun
almost
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OH SHIT ERROR!

10/2/2010 12:28:05 PM

Shadowrunner
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http://www.cnbc.com/id/39594637

Quote :
"Google Cars Drive Themselves, In Traffic"

10/11/2010 1:45:53 AM

qntmfred
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hehe i was just gonna post that

http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2010/10/what-were-driving-at.html

[Edited on October 11, 2010 at 2:38 AM. Reason : .]

10/11/2010 2:38:03 AM

AndyMac
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@ indy, I said "Have fun in Soviet Russia" not because I think this is a terrible idea or socialist, but because car drives you.

10/11/2010 10:31:19 AM

iheartkisses
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I believe in this future, too! It's possible for cars to have thoughts and feelings.

Also, I believe that cars will also be trained to fight crime and will replace police officers. Instead of having Sgt Doughnutlover chase down criminals on foot, these crime-fighting cars will speedily track down evildoers and squirt oil in their eyes, rendering them helpless.

10/11/2010 10:47:33 AM

0EPII1
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http://www.autoblog.com/2010/10/14/video-abc-news-gets-taken-for-a-spin-in-googles-self-driving-t/

Video: ABC News gets taken for a spin in Google's self-driving Toyota Prius

Video in link above.

Direct link: http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/video/test-driving-google-car-11857670

10/14/2010 4:39:14 PM

qntmfred
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http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/as_china_eu_driverless_vehicle

Quote :
"SHANGHAI – Across Eastern Europe, Russia, Kazakhstan and the Gobi Desert — it certainly was a long way to go without getting lost.

Four driverless electric vans successfully ended an 8,000-mile (13,000-kilometer) test drive from Italy to China — a modern-day version of Marco Polo's journey around the world — with their arrival at the Shanghai Expo on Thursday.

The vehicles, equipped with four solar-powered laser scanners and seven video cameras that work together to detect and avoid obstacles, are part of an experiment aimed at improving road safety and advancing automotive technology.

The sensors on the vehicles enabled them to navigate through wide extremes in road, traffic and weather conditions, while collecting data to be analyzed for further research, in a study sponsored by the European Research Council.

"We didn't know the route, I mean what the roads would have been and if we would have found nice roads, traffic, lots of traffic, medium traffic, crazy drivers or regular drivers, so we encountered the lot," said Isabella Fredriga, a research engineer for the project.

Though the vans were driverless and mapless, they did carry researchers as passengers just in case of emergencies. The experimenters did have to intervene a few times — when the vehicles got snarled in a Moscow traffic jam and to handle toll stations.

The project used no maps, often traveling through remote regions of Siberia and China. At one point, a van stopped to give a hitchhiker a lift.

A computerized artificial vision system dubbed GOLD, for Generic Obstacle and Lane Detector, analyzed the information from the sensors and automatically adjusted the vehicles' speed and direction.

"This steering wheel is controlled by the PC. So the PC sends a command and the steering wheel moves and turns and we can follow the road, follow the curves and avoid obstacles with this," said Alberto Broggi of Vislab at the University of Parma in Italy, the lead researcher for the project.
"The idea here was to travel on a long route, on two different continents, in different states, different weather, different traffic conditions, different infrastructure. Then we can have some huge number of situations to test the system on," he said.

The technology will be used to study ways to complement drivers' abilities. It also could have applications in farming, mining and construction, the researchers said.

The vehicles ran at maximum speeds of 38 miles per hour (60 kilometers per hour) and had to be recharged for eight hours after every two to three hours of driving. At times, it was monotonous and occasionally nerve-racking, inevitably due to human error, Fredriga said.

"There were a few scary moments. Like when the following vehicle bumped into the leading one and that was just because we forgot, we stopped and we forgot to turn the system off," Fredriga said.
"

10/28/2010 8:42:55 AM

OopsPowSrprs
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I would love a self-driving car. I waste 90-120 minutes of my day driving that shitbox all over hell's half-acre. It would be lovely if I could use that time to check Twitter or Facebook on my phone instead.

10/28/2010 8:49:49 AM

qntmfred
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http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/06/science/sebastian-thrun-self-driving-cars-can-save-lives-and-parking-spaces.html

Quote :
"Leave the Driving to the Car, and Reap Benefits in Safety and Mobility
By SEBASTIAN THRUN
Published: December 5, 2011

The Jetsons had them in the 1960s. They were the defining element of “Knight Rider” in the 1980s: cars that drive themselves. Self-driving cars appear in countless science fiction movies. By Hollywood standards, they are so normal we don’t even notice them.
Enlarge This Image

But in real life, they still don’t exist. So what if they were real? What if you could buy one today?

When I was 18, I lost a close friend to a car accident. His friend had taken his father’s brand-new Audi Quattro for a spin, and he took my friend along for the ride. On an icy road, the driver lost control of the car and collided head-on with a truck. Both he and my friend were declared dead at the scene.

This was not an isolated occurrence. Roughly a year ago, my lab manager succumbed to a traffic accident. A distracted driver hit her Prius at more than 50 miles an hour from the side while she was driving cautiously through an intersection.

Too many people share the same fate. In 2010, the number of traffic fatalities in the United States was 32,788, according to the Department of Transportation. In recent years, nearly all states have passed laws prohibiting the use of handheld devices while driving. Nevada took a different approach. In a first for any nation, the state passed a law that legalizes texting, provided one does so in a self-driving autonomous car. This places Nevada at the forefront of innovation.

I have been spending the better part of my professional life trying to create self-driving cars.

At Google, I am working with a world-class team of engineers to turn science fiction into reality.

Google’s vast computing resources are crucial to our technology. Our cars memorize the road infrastructure in minute detail. They use computerized maps to determine where to drive, and to anticipate road signs, traffic lights and roadblocks long before they are visible to the human eye.

Our cars use specialized lasers, radar and cameras to analyze traffic at a speed faster than the human brain can process. And they leverage the cloud to share information at blazing speed.

Our self-driving cars have now traveled nearly 200,000 miles on public highways in California and Nevada, 100 percent safely. They have driven from San Francisco to Los Angeles and around Lake Tahoe, and have even descended crooked Lombard Street in San Francisco. They drive anywhere a car can legally drive.

I am confident that our self-driving cars will transform mobility. By this I mean they will affect all aspects of moving people and things around and result in a fundamentally improved infrastructure.

Take today’s cities. They are full of parked cars. I estimate that the average car is immobile 96 percent of its lifetime. This situation leads to a world full of underused cars and occupied parking spaces.

Self-driving cars will enable car sharing even in spread-out suburbs. A car will come to you just when you need it. And when you are done with it, the car will just drive away, so you won’t even have to look for parking.

Self-driving cars can also change the way we use our highways. The European Union has recently started a program to develop technologies for vehicle platoons on public highways. “Platooning” is technical lingo for self-driving cars that drive so closely together that they behave more like trains than individual cars. Research at the University of California, Berkeley, has shown that the fuel consumption of trucks can be reduced by up to 21 percent simply by drafting behind other trucks. And it is easy to imagine that our highways can bear more cars, if cars drive closer together.

Last but not least, self-driving cars will be good news for the millions of Americans who are blind or have brain injury, Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease. Tens of millions of Americans are denied the privilege of operating motor vehicles today because of issues related to health or age.

Some of these changes are far out in the future. But I envision a future in which our technology is available to everyone, in every car. I envision a future without traffic accidents or congestion. A future where everyone can use a car.

Sebastian Thrun is a Google Fellow and a research professor at Stanford."

12/6/2011 2:43:33 PM

lewisje
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we have the technology

12/6/2011 2:46:17 PM

qntmfred
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2/27/2012 8:10:56 PM

EMCE
balls deep
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Meant to post this the other day, but I got busy at work and forgot to actually find this thread:

http://www.ibtimes.com/articles/300716/20120217/driverless-car-google-nevada-automated.htm

Quote :
"It's time for the next big automotive revolution.

A century ago, the horse-drawn carriage became obsolete. Within the last decade, GPS technology rendered paper maps useless. And if the electric movement gets going in earnest, gasoline may one day be a thing of the past.

Next on the chopping block: the need for human drivers.

Google is behind this development. For years, they've been developing the technology to make automated cars a reality. They've also spearheaded lobbying efforts in Nevada, which just became the first state to approve regulations for testing driverless cars. This gives technology companies an official procedure for taking their self-driven automobiles out on public roads.

Now, companies must pay the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles anywhere from $1 million to $3 million in order to test driverless vehicles. They must specify exactly where they plan to run these tests, and show that their cars will be capable of handling those environments. And unless otherwise specified by the Department, there must always be two occupants in the vehicle; one must be in a position to take control on case of an emergency. The state released a full set of regulations on their website.

Nevada already legalized driverless cars back in June of last year, but there was no a legal framework in place for companies to test their vehicles. Now, Google and other technology firms have the green light to get on the road.

This is not to suggest that Google has been waiting patiently for legal permission. They were awarded a U.S. patent for self-driving technology in December of last year, and they've been developing the technology since 2008. And they've been conducting tests on California roadways for months, logging roughly 200,000 miles. Without laws in existence to regulate the legality of that testing, this was a risky move -- but it has paid off. Now Google is a pioneer in the field, with cutting-edge technology that uses GPS maps, innovative sensors and backup safety mechanisms to prevent accidents.

Consumers will likely have to wait several years before these machines hit the market, but they can look forward to a range of benefits. These automobiles can increase mobility for disabled people, ease traffic by reacting intelligently to other cars on the road, and promote safety. Unlike humans, automated cars don't get tired, drunk or distracted.

"We want to improve people's lives by making driving safer, more enjoyable, and more efficient. Over 1.2 million people are killed in traffic worldwide every year, and we think autonomous technology can significantly reduce that number," said a Google spokesperson via email.

"As for next steps... we're continuing to develop and refine the technology, and we will continue conversations with state and federal authorities, but we aren't going to elaborate about specific plans at this point.""

2/27/2012 8:17:58 PM

qntmfred
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3/14/2012 8:30:46 PM

BubbleBobble
SO COME ALL U GIRLS!
107756 Posts
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in b4 the implementation of cars driving themselves and thousands of deaths because of hackers

3/14/2012 9:00:00 PM

Hiro
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4639 Posts
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Quote :
"I believe in a future "


I berieve too. I mean, I'm living in yesterday's tomorrow. How cool is dat?

3/14/2012 9:47:00 PM

qntmfred
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3/28/2012 5:47:24 PM

qntmfred
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Here's a couple more videos from the Programming a Robotic Car course that is being offered by the lead researcher on the google self-driving car project



4/7/2012 11:25:53 AM

qntmfred
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http://www.inquisitr.com/227496/cadillac-to-release-self-driving-cars-by-2015-video/

Quote :
"Ever heard of Super Cruise? If not, there’s a good chance you will as the concept of self-driving cars quickly find their way into our everyday lives.

General Motors owned Cadillac has proposed that they will have the first fully autonomous car available to the public, and plan to do so by the year 2015 … only 3 years from now.

Cadillac has termed the main function of their developing self-driving technology as “Super Cruise”. This fully functioning aspect of their cars will make an attempt to use cameras, radar, and ultrasonic sensors to detect it’s surroundings, while the active GPS navigation will make certain that the car knows exactly where it is at all times while driving.

Cars such as Cadillac’s ATS and XTS are already equipped with features, such as their forward collision warning, reaction cruise control, front and rear cameras, as well as highly efficient GPS systems. However, Cadillac only see’s those features as building blocks for their self-driving cars.

“We see the semi-autonomous vehicle, or self-driving vehicle as the next stage in that evolution” toward full autonomy,” said Don Butler, VP of Cadillac marketing.

According to Cadillac, one of the main features still in development is the pivotal “lane centering” technology. When combined with the other pieces of the puzzle, this will allow the car to see the lines that make up driving lanes and ensure that the car stays centered while en route to it’s destination. Coupled with the GPS, the car with be able to be aware of the exact lay out of the road. The only exception is when the lines do not exist, or are not visible, in which case the driver will have to take the old-fashioned route and drive with both hands.

Will you be in line to buy one of these self-driving cars? If not, what do you find unappealing about the idea of a self-driving car?"

4/30/2012 2:58:57 PM

Tarun
almost
11687 Posts
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cool! i will check with my friends from GM if they know about this?

4/30/2012 3:03:59 PM

EMCE
balls deep
88530 Posts
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http://us.cnn.com/2012/05/07/tech/nevada-driveless-car/index.html?hpt=hp_t3

5/8/2012 8:26:17 AM

sumfoo1
soup du hier
41036 Posts
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i like to drive and i will wrecks your space carz

5/8/2012 8:31:13 AM

qntmfred
retired
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5/8/2012 9:28:26 AM

NCSUStinger
Burn It All Down
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Please state a street and number.

5/8/2012 9:49:42 AM

qntmfred
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http://blogs.wsj.com/drivers-seat/2012/07/18/opinion-paving-the-way-for-driverless-cars/

Quote :
"California’s proposed bullet train between Los Angeles and San Francisco—which Gov. Jerry Brown is likely to sign off on soon—has been characterized by the Obama administration and its other supporters as an effective way to reduce highway congestion. These costs amount to more than $100 billion annually in wasted time and higher fuel expenses.

In fact, a much better technological solution is on the horizon, if we pave the way by getting rid of obsolete highway design. It is already possible to imagine a world in which you could predict exactly how long it would take to drive in your car from one point to another. No worries about rush hour, vacation congestion, bad drivers, speed traps and accidents. You could also text while you drive with no safety implications.

All this may be possible thanks to a “driverless” car that does a human driver’s normal job and much more. The car is operated by a computer that obtains information 10 times per second from short-range transmitters on surrounding road conditions, including where other cars are and what they are doing.

That’s exponentially faster than the human mind can process the same information. By gathering and reacting immediately to real-time information, the technology can drastically reduce highway fatalities by preventing collisions. It also can significantly reduce delays by creating a smoother traffic flow and rerouting drivers who have programmed their destinations.

Google’s version is being piloted in Nevada, and it could prove that faster, reliable and safer road travel is within reach. But one stumbling block would remain: the government-run roads this innovation must use. Auto makers have made one technological improvement after another since the car was introduced to consumers more than a century ago. Unfortunately, the paved road systems on which cars travel have not advanced much in comparison. Without reimagining the way we design and maintain highways, the driverless car will achieve little of its potential.

Despite the frustratingly frequent lane closures for repairs, about one-third of the nation’s highways are still in poor or mediocre condition. Driving on damaged roads is hard on vehicles and is estimated to cost motorists billions of dollars annually. Those potholes could also defeat the purpose of the driverless car because it would be unable to avoid them, or succeed in doing so only by significantly disturbing the traffic flow.

Most highways in major metropolitan areas operate under congested conditions during much of the day. Yet highways are designed around standards based on higher free-flow travel speeds that call for wider but fewer lanes. Driverless cars don’t need the same wide lanes, which would allow highway authorities to reconfigure roads to allow travel speeds to be raised during peak travel periods. All that is needed would be illuminated lane dividers that can increase the number of lanes available. Driverless cars could take advantage of the extra lane capacity to reduce congestion and delays.

Another design flaw is that highways have been built in terms of width and thickness to accommodate both cars and trucks. The smaller volume of trucks should be handled with one or two wide lanes with a road surface about a foot thick, to withstand trucks’ weight and axle pressure. But the much larger volume of cars—which apply much less axle pressure that damages pavement—need more and narrower lanes that are only a few inches thick.

Building highways that separate cars and trucks by directing them to lanes with the appropriate thickness would save taxpayers a bundle. It would also favor the technology of driverless cars because they would not have to distinguish between cars and trucks and to adjust speeds and positions accordingly.

Traffic management also suffers from obsolete technology that could hinder implementing the driverless car. On local streets, signal timing contributes to hundreds of millions of vehicle hours of annual delay because it is based on out-of-date historical data that inaccurately measure relative traffic volumes at intersections. Without signals based on real-time traffic flows, driverless vehicles may not be able to accurately align their speeds with them.

The future also holds the promise of new communications technologies that could let road authorities use electronic tolls to charge motorists for their contribution to congestion, based on actual traffic conditions, and thus encourage them to travel during off-peak periods, use alternate routes, or switch to public transit. Driverless cars would significantly help motorists respond to congestion tolls because their technology can balance the cost of a toll with its travel time savings to optimize motorists’ route choices.

The driverless car represents one of the most amazing breakthroughs in safety and quality of life in recent history. Instead of focusing on enormously expensive high-speed rail as our transportation future, the government would do well to stop hindering driverless cars by its obsolete thinking about our nation’s roads.

One promising approach that would not require taxpayer funds would be to turn to innovative private highway companies, which have leased the Indiana toll road, Chicago Skyway and Dulles Greenway. By working closely with auto makers, they could significantly shorten the time that motorists must wait before they fully realize the benefits of driverless technology.

Mr. Winston is a senior fellow in economic studies at the Brookings Institution and author of “Last Exit: Privatization and Deregulation of the U.S. Transportation System” (Brookings Press, 2010)."

7/21/2012 7:44:22 PM

The Coz
Tempus Fugitive
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Not quite self-driving cars, but. . .

http://news.cnet.com/8301-11386_3-57472376-76/

Quote :
"He (Bill Ford) gave several scenarios that illustrate how smart vehicles and smart infrastructure connected together on a common network could help streamline transportation:

* A smart road system with eight lanes in a major city automatically switches between six inbound and two outbound lanes in the morning to four of each during the day to two inbound and six outbound in the afternoon, all based on timing and traffic levels.

* A car runs into a traffic jam on the highway and signals the network, which signals the cars behind it to change course and take a different route.

* In a really bad traffic jam, the car is alerted and the driver pulls over to a metro train stop and hops on the train and takes that into work, and then after work takes the train back to the station where the car is.

* A red traffic light senses that you're coming down the road at midnight with no other cars around and changes to green so that you don't have to stop, and waste time and fuel in the process.

* A smartphone app matches you up with the nearest cab in New York City.

* You get in your car to go downtown and your car automatically goes out and books you a parking spot and then uses the GPS system to direct you to that spot, saving on fuel and traffic congestion.

While some of the technologies are already available to start making this happen and we can see glimpses of it, Bill Ford sees a lot more innovation being needed to fill the gaps, and he has been appealing to engineers and entrepreneurs to dedicate some of their resources and their startups to the transportation industry in general and to global gridlock specifically.

"We need our best and our brightest to start entertaining this issue. Companies, entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, they all need to understand this is a huge business opportunity as well as an enormous social problem," Ford said."

7/21/2012 8:39:20 PM

mrfrog

15145 Posts
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i believe in revolution

7/21/2012 11:54:02 PM

arcgreek
All American
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In soviet Russa

Cars drive you

7/22/2012 12:04:13 AM

ncsufanalum
All American
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What happens when your self operating vehicle inadvertently navigates you directly into a lake like that episode of The Office. What will you say about your dozens of sensors and research then?

7/22/2012 12:12:22 AM

The Coz
Tempus Fugitive
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Quote :
"What will you say about your dozens of sensors and research then?"


7/22/2012 2:05:58 PM

qntmfred
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Quote :
"you won't need to buy your own car anymore. transportation will be dominated by ubiquitous, small, energy-efficient taxi vehicles, only much cheaper than today's cabs"


http://techcrunch.com/2013/08/22/google-ventures-puts-258m-into-uber-its-largest-deal-ever/


itbegins.gif

8/22/2013 11:06:20 PM

qntmfred
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http://www.cnn.com/2013/08/27/tech/innovation/nissan-driverless-car/index.html

Quote :
"Nissan: We'll have a self-driving car on roads in 2020


Nissan intends to start testing such vehicles by 2014. It's unclear how long Nissan has been testing the technology, though the release refers to "years." Google began road-testing its self-driven autos in 2010. The search giant has no stated intention to use the cars for commercial purposes. However, the company could benefit from selling its technology to automakers.
The automaker does not appear to be working with Google on its Autonomous Vehicles as it dubs them. However, it has developing the technology "alongside teams from the world's top universities, including MIT, Stanford, Oxford, Carnegie Mellon and the University of Tokyo," according to the release.
"


[Edited on August 27, 2013 at 7:14 PM. Reason : it would take a hell of a lot for me to ever own a nissan again though. pos sentras]

8/27/2013 7:13:08 PM

justinh524
RIP BigMan157 :(
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I don't want a driverless car, I love driving.

8/27/2013 7:23:31 PM

Smath74
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i'd like to see an HOV lane type deal for driverless cars once they become ubiquitous that allows for super high speed, bumper to bumper travel.

8/27/2013 9:06:21 PM

qntmfred
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[Edited on September 22, 2013 at 8:52 PM. Reason : t]

9/22/2013 8:49:51 PM

ncsuapex
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Watching cars drive is boring.

9/23/2013 8:01:40 AM

BridgetSPK
#1 Sir Purr Fan
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Will these cars go 15 over and blast Cyndi Lauper songs? Presently, this is my only means to express what a total badass I am.

Also, what type of fines should we anticipate for lewd conduct in one of your unmanned vehicles? Can we arrange for reduced fines if we pay in advance?

9/23/2013 10:33:22 AM

marko
Tom Joad
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because the old link was broken

good news, everything will be solved by the 1970s/80

9/23/2013 10:44:56 AM

ncsuapex
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setemup

9/23/2013 8:17:14 PM

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