User not logged in - login - register
Home Calendar Books School Tool Photo Gallery Message Boards Users Statistics Advertise Site Info
go to bottom | |
 Message Boards » » Kitchen Knives Page 1 [2], Prev  
Seotaji
All American
34244 Posts
user info
edit post

I LOVE shun knives. Sure there are better, but it's what I have.

Quote :
"I hate on cutco a lot, but I will say that they have the nicest grip of any knife ive used. However, the blades are fucking garbage. "


The one of the best grips on a knife I've found so far is the sysco knives. Silicone rubber handle with texture.

[Edited on January 6, 2011 at 10:15 PM. Reason : The quality of the blade is also pretty good.]

1/6/2011 10:15:22 PM

DoubleDown
All American
9382 Posts
user info
edit post

Why do so many people think they need a full knife set? Is this just something people imagine from when they were a kid?

1/7/2011 1:03:35 AM

AC Slater
All American
9276 Posts
user info
edit post

yea. to me they are waste of money to me


Ive had 1 knife for the past 3 years

a really nice henkel santuko with a heavy handle



whenever im in the market for a new one im gonna look at henkel, wustof and shun

prolly an 8-10" chefs knife

1/7/2011 9:34:34 AM

DoubleDown
All American
9382 Posts
user info
edit post

Quote :
"whenever im in the market for a new one im gonna look at henkel, wustof and shun"


exactly, i would rather have 1 really good knife that is well made, well balanced and fits my hand perfectly than a whole set of semi-ok knives. a kitchen knife is a tool, and a 6-8inch chef knife can do 90% of average kitchen duty

1/7/2011 10:11:42 AM

SMokE
Veteran
227 Posts
user info
edit post

I really enjoy using the Shun knives I bought over the course of the last few years. The balance is good, the steel is high quality and holds an edge well, and I really like the look. The only thing some folks might not like is that they are Asian-style knives, so no bolster. The knives I have are from the Steel series, which I believe is being discontinued, but if you can find them for a good price, I would definitely recommend them. Despite being all steel, I have had no problems with the knives sliding in my hand due to the shape of the handle and a proper grip.

My second favorite knives are actually stamped knives, the Forscher/Victorionox knives. They perform amazingly well for stamped knives and the fibrox handles provide a nice grip. I have also used some of the Global knives, and they are on par with my Shun knives in performance.

If you are buying new knives, start by investing in a few quality knives rather than buying a huge set of cheap knives. Start with a chef's knife and a paring knife, then add a bread knife, followed by a boning knife. After that, you can consider specialty knives for foods that you prepare often, but that basic set of 4 knives will handle just about anything. Make sure you get a steel for your knives and learn to use it, often. Steeling a knife is not the same as sharpening a knife; the goal is to straighten the edge after creating small bends in it from using the knife, not to remove material from the knife. A knife made from good steel will last a long time between sharpening with proper care, which includes steeling and careful hand-washing.

There are a lot of people that have never used a quality knife before. I have had several people try out my knives and tell me they didn't even think that it was possible for there to be such a drastic difference. If you are one of those people, you are in for a real treat. With proper care and technique, a few good knives will make cooking more enjoyable and safer.

2/24/2011 10:49:26 AM

timswar
All American
41050 Posts
user info
edit post

I've got a nice little scar on my thumb now from a Shun knife. Mother-in-Law picked us up a couple when we half-moved up to DC so that we'd have some decent knives up here (you can usually get some good Shuns cheap from Tuesday Morning or Homegoods). The butchers knife apparently decided it wanted my blood instead of the chicken it was supposed to be cutting.

So I like our Shun ones now, especially the smaller paring knife, but I'm really careful with them.

2/24/2011 11:17:49 AM

dubcaps
All American
4753 Posts
user info
edit post

I recently picked up an 8" Henckel Four Star II chef's knife. It's quite an upgrade from the $5-$15 knives that I got accustomed to using during college.

2/24/2011 11:30:34 AM

SMokE
Veteran
227 Posts
user info
edit post

Yeah, I've had my share of nicks too, but I definitely prefer those to the nasty injuries that you are more prone to get when a dull knife forces you to use bad technique and too much pressure.

In my experience, I could have avoided most of the cuts I've had by doing things right instead of trying to take a shortcut. Based on that, here are a few bits of advice to keep your fingers:

1) Keep your knives sharp.
2) Use a large, stable cutting board. I prefer wood for vegetables, and plastic for meats. Keep the wood board oiled properly, and replace the plastic ones as they wear out.
3) Learn to hold knives properly. There's a good picture in this thread already for a chef's knife; a paring knife is usually used with one hand, pulling it with your fingers towards your thumb.
4) Learn what to do with your non-knife hand. Use a claw grip while chopping to keep your thumb out of the way, and cut away from yourself (and your hand) when boning or filleting something. There are very few cuts that require you to cut towards yourself.
5) Avoid cutting things that roll. Carefully make the first cut to create a flat surface on the food, then set it flat on the cutting board for the rest of the cuts.

2/24/2011 11:40:12 AM

timswar
All American
41050 Posts
user info
edit post

^6) Never try to cut a stale bagel using anything other than a downward cut.

[Edited on February 24, 2011 at 6:03 PM. Reason : /]

2/24/2011 6:03:30 PM

AC Slater
All American
9276 Posts
user info
edit post

7) Never split two stuck frozen hamburger patties with a knife while holding the patties in the other hand.



2/25/2011 6:25:46 PM

Jeepin4x4
Cam Time Steamroller
35397 Posts
user info
edit post

bttt...this is more about cookware than knives but pilgrimshoes mentioned it might be the most viable thread.

looking to get a basic 12-15 piece set of cookware pots and pans. I have a few cast-iron pieces I like to use, but am looking for something that can be cleaned easily and heats evenly. The SO doesn't cook near as much as I do, but I'm still not ready to break the bank. any suggestions on what to look for or stay away from?

I just moved to a new place with an electric stove(coils) if that has major impact.

3/28/2011 4:48:31 PM

DoubleDown
All American
9382 Posts
user info
edit post

I stand by Calphalon Tri-Ply Stainless - been using a few pieces for years

http://www.amazon.com/Calphalon-Triply-Stainless-13-Piece-Cookware/dp/B003L1CW8S

3/28/2011 4:51:56 PM

Jeepin4x4
Cam Time Steamroller
35397 Posts
user info
edit post

http://www.amazon.com/Calphalon-Contemporary-Nonstick-12-Piece-Set/dp/B000WB0OM6/ref=sr_1_11?ie=UTF8&qid=1301407407&sr=8-11


thoughts?

3/29/2011 10:04:32 AM

Wadhead1
Duke is puke
20897 Posts
user info
edit post

No idea. I do know that my fiance and I have this set and it's pretty good.

http://www.amazon.com/Cuisinart-MCP-12-MultiClad-Stainless-12-Piece/dp/B0007KQZWU/ref=sr_1_1?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1301408031&sr=1-1

3/29/2011 10:14:40 AM

DoubleDown
All American
9382 Posts
user info
edit post

^^ the Calphalon "contemporary" line is like the Walmart line from Calphalon. Stick with Tri-Ply or Commercial line from them. Also, you do not need nonstick everything - there are really only a few situations where nonstick is needed, and teflon and the associated chemicals are deemed a carcinogen by the EPA.

Also, with non-stick it is almost impossible to create a proper fond / sucs for deglazing

3/29/2011 10:34:10 AM

sumfoo1
soup du hier
41038 Posts
user info
edit post

I skipped the $texas knifes (i got kitchen aid) and got this.
http://www.surlatable.com/product/PRO-619502/Chef%27sChoice-Angle-Select-Electric-Knife-Sharpener
only in brushed stainless.

we had a calphalon pan set and sold it because the coatings were shot.
we may get another however.

3/29/2011 3:03:38 PM

SMokE
Veteran
227 Posts
user info
edit post

I second the Cuisinart Multiclad Pro recommendation. They are built like All-Clad cookware, but less expensive. I also have a few pieces of Lodge brand cast iron that I enjoy using, but the clean up is a bit more work.

3/30/2011 10:56:43 AM

msb2ncsu
All American
14033 Posts
user info
edit post

Here's what I would consider the essential pans:

8-inch nonstick fry pan (just get cheap, it will get replaced frequently)
10-inch stainless steel fry pan
12-inch Saute Pan with lid
3-quart Saucepan/Saucier with lid (don't get teflon, you often need to whisk sauces)
12-inch cast iron skillet
6-quart Cast Iron Dutch Oven (enamel-coated is definitely best)
8 to 12 quart stock pot (cheap stainless steel is all you need)

3/31/2011 1:44:38 AM

DoubleDown
All American
9382 Posts
user info
edit post

^ i think a 1.5 quart sauce pot comes in handy, too

http://www.amazon.com/All-Clad-5201-5-Stainless-2-Quart-Saucepan/dp/B00028X2V4/

3/31/2011 9:11:00 AM

baonest
All American
47902 Posts
user info
edit post

just picked up a shun classic 5.5" santoku from william sonoma. on sale for $69. and if you're a chef, or know one. they get 15-20% off on top of that.

talk about a step up from your everyday knife.

4/14/2011 10:14:09 PM

dubcaps
All American
4753 Posts
user info
edit post

how do you prove that you are a chef? my dad owns a restaurant...

4/14/2011 11:56:02 PM

baonest
All American
47902 Posts
user info
edit post

Go there and say "I'm a chef" and they'll give you an application type of thing to fill out. They may want a pay stub or something that proves it. I honestly don't know because I went with a friend and just heard the exchange. I didn't look at the application or anything. But they offered her the discount when we went there and just asked her to fill the app out and mail it in.

Btw. Im not 100% on the discount amount. It's between 10-20. They gave her 20% off yesterday. But said it would be 10%.

I heard sur la tab is 15% off.

[Edited on April 15, 2011 at 6:58 AM. Reason : ]

4/15/2011 6:55:14 AM

pilgrimshoes
Suspended
63151 Posts
user info
edit post

parents are in town

found the gfs wusthoff pairing knife in the dishwasher



[Edited on April 15, 2011 at 9:48 AM. Reason : e]

4/15/2011 9:47:24 AM

msb2ncsu
All American
14033 Posts
user info
edit post

yeah, I caught the mother-in-law using a wusthoff paring knife slicing up some cheese on a dinner plate. She would slice down then scrape laterally to push the cheese to the side. Its like she was trying her best to anything and everything to dull the blades. #facepalm

4/15/2011 3:50:59 PM

DoubleDown
All American
9382 Posts
user info
edit post

I don't specifically mind people dulling the blades, but putting the knives in the dishwasher can really cause some problems with the handle that cannot be fixed

4/15/2011 4:01:04 PM

pilgrimshoes
Suspended
63151 Posts
user info
edit post

i am probably going to pick up either a cleaver or a boning knife in the near future.

i've been breaking down a lot of meats by hand recently, and im wondering if im doing my largest chef's knife a disservice by using it to say, quarter and clean a chicken.

i've been getting into home butchering recently, and have been finding it quite enjoyable. idk.

coincidentally, i've got a $300 williams sonoma gift card burning a hole in my pocket.

so the question is, those of you who have one or both, which should i go with, and why.

thanks!

6/2/2011 1:08:29 PM

msb2ncsu
All American
14033 Posts
user info
edit post

I use my boning knife all the time. I have little use for a cleaver because all I do is break down chickens, roasts, ribs, etc. and rarely have to cleave through bone (more just joint/knuckle cutting). I use a 10in chef's knife so its not remotely practical for a lot of boning work and both my paring knives are just a little too small (plus have a bit more flex). The boning knife is really just the right size and heft for what I do.

I have a Wusthof boning knife but I'd just go with a Victorinox for about 1/5 the price ($14/$19 for flex/stiff on Amazon). The handles on "premium" knives get slick when they get greasy because they are always materials like lacquered wood, smooth composite, or polished steel. The Victorinox has a textured handles that are much less resistant to slipping (a big plus when breaking down fatty meats). Plus, since the blades do wear significantly faster when boning than normal knife usage you don't feel as guilty about grinding away your blade in an electric grinder. I'd also go cheap for a cleaver if you really need it, not like the action is delicate or intricate to warrant high dollar knife.

Save the gift card for a nice pan.

6/2/2011 4:51:10 PM

sumfoo1
soup du hier
41038 Posts
user info
edit post

yeah my future brother in law and sister in law are rich as crap and treat our "nice things" as disposable. drives me up the friggin wall.

Then if we don't want to let them borrow something for fear of the condition it will be returned we get the "we let you borrow shit all the time" (because we return it in better condition then it was when we got it)

6/10/2011 1:25:20 PM

dubcaps
All American
4753 Posts
user info
edit post

we just got a shun classic set as a late wedding gift from my aunt and uncle . while i think the handles on our henckel four star ii's is definitely functionally superior (it's rubberized and grippy rather than shiny and smooth) there isn't any comparison on the blades. the shuns are just silly. plus the blades look incredibly hot.

i am very excited.

7/3/2011 11:15:48 PM

DoubleDown
All American
9382 Posts
user info
edit post

Anyone want to sell any of their Wusthoff Classics?

7/4/2011 1:26:40 AM

sumfoo1
soup du hier
41038 Posts
user info
edit post

^^ i'm not a fan of henckel at all i like my blades to be balanced at the tang and most henckels just aren't.

7/4/2011 11:04:46 AM

GREEN JAY
All American
14179 Posts
user info
edit post

wusthof classic ikon was my favorite today

7/30/2011 9:54:06 PM

dave421
All American
1391 Posts
user info
edit post

^ vs the day before or did you do a bunch of testing or what? kinda confused by your wording.

7/31/2011 9:41:46 AM

GREEN JAY
All American
14179 Posts
user info
edit post

yeah, i went and played with a bunch at a local store yesterday. I ended up buying an offset 8" henckels bread knife because that's what i went in there for, it was a discontinued model they overpriced and the salesperson knew absolutely nothing though. she kept showing me crap and then going oh, they're expensive when i wanted to handle the decent knives guess i won't be going back.

that's what i got, for $35 canadian

7/31/2011 11:52:40 AM

dubcaps
All American
4753 Posts
user info
edit post

my wife and i have been doing a lot of cooking lately which has led to arguments over who gets the chef's knife and who gets stuck with the smaller utility knife. we couldn't really justify buying another shun so i started looking for other options. a lot of people seemed really impressed with kiwi brand knives that are generally available at asian markets for <$10. i picked up a #21 today and am pretty impressed with it. the blade is very thin, and while it's not as sharp as our shun, it's definitely impressive for the price, and probably a bit sharper than the henckels i had a few months back. there is no telling how well it will hold an edge, but i think it has a ton of bang for the buck.

some reviews:
http://www.patiodaddiobbq.com/2010/01/discovery-kiwi-knives.html

http://www.kk.org/cooltools/archives/004140.php

http://www.foodbuzz.com/blogs/708451-another-post-about-kiwi-knives-sigh-

http://www.tactical-life.com/online/tactical-knives/credible-cutters-on-the-cheap/?hp=exclusives_img

10/3/2011 9:31:14 PM

Agent 0
All American
5677 Posts
user info
edit post

just ordered my first set of Wustoff Classics. looking forward to losing weight via a few fingers shortly.

10/10/2011 7:22:27 PM

Agent 0
All American
5677 Posts
user info
edit post

*wustof

10/11/2011 3:26:38 PM

kiljadn
All American
44663 Posts
user info
edit post

^^^kinda funny that you have arguments over who gets what knife



the pleasures of being married, I suppose

[Edited on October 11, 2011 at 10:10 PM. Reason : .]

10/11/2011 10:10:33 PM

Agent 0
All American
5677 Posts
user info
edit post

wow. these bitches are sharp as shit...

first set of decent knives.

10/12/2011 12:42:27 PM

dave421
All American
1391 Posts
user info
edit post

^5

I ordered the 11" "pointed end" knife and got it yesterday. I'm always having to wash my good knife in the middle of prep after forgetting to cut up some vegetable or something until after I've started teimming chicken or something so a cheap, sharp knife that's not shit will hopefully come in handy. First impressions say that's it's very sharp but surprisingly light (I thought the box I received was not the knife since even packaged and boxed it's
lighter than other cheap knives I've used). Even if it's complete crap, it's cheap enough that it won't matter. It definitely will not replace my everyday Henckel santoku that's treated me well for 10 years now.

10/13/2011 6:20:46 PM

Hiro
All American
4665 Posts
user info
edit post

Bamboo cutting boards ftw.

10/13/2011 10:27:41 PM

Agent 0
All American
5677 Posts
user info
edit post

i feel like i will only ever use about 20% of the full potential of these knives. and i love that.

i got an 8-inch chef’s knife, a 6-inch sandwich knife, an 8-inch serrated bread knife, a 4-1/2-inch utility knife, and a 3-1/2-inch paring knife. plus 6 steak knives and a block for them all with 4 extra expansion slots.

they are amazing.

10/14/2011 9:31:12 PM

 Message Boards » Old School » Kitchen Knives Page 1 [2], Prev  
go to top | |
Admin Options : move topic | lock topic

© 2019 by The Wolf Web - All Rights Reserved.
The material located at this site is not endorsed, sponsored or provided by or on behalf of North Carolina State University.
Powered by CrazyWeb v2.37 - our disclaimer.