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 Message Boards » » Leaving a Job After a Promotion Page [1]  
CaelNCSU
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Suppose you just got promoted and you bounce to another gig inside of a couple of months. How would this be perceived? Gotten mixed feedback on if it helps/hurts you. I personally feel it would help you get the next gig.

10/6/2018 3:28:53 PM

SuperDude
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Sure your previous employer won't like it, guess that would be a good way to burn a bridge.

I assume the newer employer will ask what type of value you were able to bring at your new position if you had not been there for very long but if you have a good answer, that concern can go away.

Basically, as long as you know you won't go back to your old company anytime soon, don't see the harm.

10/6/2018 3:50:31 PM

Dentaldamn
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I’d hope everyones an adult and understands people leave companies. Are you under contract?

10/6/2018 3:57:30 PM

CaelNCSU
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Basically everyone just asked, "why I would do that?" and I had a good answer. It's pretty amicable with the old place.

Guess my main question was if it's seen at the new employer during the interview as a positive or negative. The promotion in my case was more an acknowledgement that I was full filling the role already as opposed to a validation of previous responsibility.

[Edited on October 6, 2018 at 6:14 PM. Reason : A]

10/6/2018 6:13:36 PM

Dentaldamn
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Quote :
"Basically everyone just asked, "why I would do that?" "


Is the other company giving you more money? Is it a better job?

You arnt married to your job and don’t need to explain why you want to work one place or another. You live in a at will employment state. Do what you need to do.

10/6/2018 9:43:22 PM

TreeTwista10
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10/6/2018 11:08:16 PM

BobbyDigital
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Quote :
"Guess my main question was if it's seen at the new employer during the interview as a positive or negative."


As a hiring manager, my goal is to get the best candidate I can find for the job. If I knew you just got s promotion, I’d probably just assume my opening offers something better if there isn’t a history of rapid job hopping. If I was having trouble with retention, I might scrutinize the move after promo thing more, but my experience tells me that if I have a retention problem, I have shit *I* need to fix.

So, long story short, don’t worry about it. In a situation where you just got a promotion, and two months later they announce layoffs, they’ll still let you go if you’re on that list. Do what’s best for you, as your employers will do the same.

10/7/2018 10:34:14 AM

CaelNCSU
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^ That's the type of insight I was looking for, thanks.

Job hoppers are a red flag, everyone I've interviewed who has 1 year or less stints that we went on to hire has been a disaster. Especially if the hops are places with 1 year equity cliffs and they left before time was up.

Every interview panel has some bullshit justification about why it's not an issue that they could be coming from startups or the commute was bad or whatever.

[Edited on October 7, 2018 at 11:32 AM. Reason : A]

10/7/2018 11:31:21 AM

Nighthawk
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Yea one of my coworkers did this at our last job. We promoted him from an onsite support position to a remote support job after he'd been in the onsite position for a couple of years. In about a month he announced he was going to a different school across the street for a big pay bump. We totally understood and his new job got it as well as his overall record was not a job hopper and in my opinion it would reflect well that the person you are recruiting is making progress at their current job, even if you are going to be scooping them up.

Ironically a few months later that same former coworker interviewed me to be his new boss; although I had applied before he started his new job. After the arduously slow HR process that it takes with public higher education, became his manager a few months later.

10/8/2018 7:01:08 AM

ncsuallday
Sink the Flagship
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A guy at my work went from admin support, to analyst, to senior/managing analyst, to director within like an 18 month period just puddle jumping form department to department, brown nosing, and just being insanely lucky with turnover to where he was the most senior person by default and forcing promotions. It was insane that he ever made director in the first place and he had the job all of two weeks before taking an executive position with our largest competitor and they had to start a national search over again. I've never seen or heard of a trajectory like that and everyone hated him, but somehow he politicked his way up the chain.

10/8/2018 10:43:33 AM

SSS
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Do what's best for you. Sounds like you're good at what you do, so taking the next step in your career is your decision and most reasonable people wouldn't fault you for that.

10/8/2018 1:29:40 PM

CapnObvious
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Sometimes managers will give employees promotions and pay bumps just to try to keep them in a job if they are considered a flight risk. An employee would be dumb to turn these down even if they were looking elsewhere, and they sometimes still jump ship after that. The goal is to make it worth their while to stick around.

You are inconveniencing that one manager, but not really anyone else. Basically the work they put in to get this done in the first place and maybe a slight hit to their character if they stuck their neck out to vouch for you.

10/8/2018 2:21:51 PM

SSS
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^ Not a manager, but that reminds me of the time(s) I vouched for a fellow State grad on a job in my office, and he got it and stayed a week.

Then, three years later, he applied for a job in my new office and was offered the position after a lengthy interview/visit process, and he declined.

People stopped asking me to vouch for candidates after that.

10/10/2018 3:09:21 PM

kiljadn
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Quote :
"Do what’s best for you, as your employers will do the same."


I left probably a month after I got promoted at my last job. Much the same boat, was already doing the job I was promoted in to. I got a better offer (a much better offer, frankly) and bolted, but amicably.

[Edited on October 12, 2018 at 8:32 PM. Reason : .]

10/12/2018 8:32:40 PM

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